Occupations at our National Parks

Occupations at our National Parks

Parks Canada: A place to work with your hands and heart

“On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations” ~ Parks Canada

Canada’s National Parks Day takes place the third Saturday of each July and it is an occasion to celebrate our country’s maginficient natural and historic sites and the people who take care of them.

People who work at Canada’s national parks protect and preserve our national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas for future generations.

They are the friendly faces that welcome us at the visitor centers, they are the storytellers that open our eyes to different perspectives on Canada’s history and they are also the people who work behind-the-scenes to help make our park experiences enjoyable and meaningful.

Parks Canada is the name of the federal department that does all this. There are many different positions across our national parks and every person plays a critical role in helping to protect, preserve, and share these special places and stories with all of us.

Occupations at Parks Canada are diverse and range from Education Specialist and Park Warden to Wildland Firefighter and Physical Science Technician. They also include an established student employment program that includes summer jobs, part-time positions and co-op work experiences.

A more commonly know position, that of Park Ranger, or Park Warden, plays a key role in preserving Canada’s natural resources – a park warden studies, monitors and manages ecosystems and is essential in decision making by providing scientific information. A Park Warden’s other role is ensuring the safety of visitors by developing public safety programs and providing law enforcement services in Canada’s national parks. They wear a distinct uniform and carry personal protective equipment. They also build partnerships with neighbouring communities.

When hiring, Parks Canada requires a post-secondary education with a diploma or degree in natural resource management, environmental sciences with related coursework in a discipline such as botany or forestry or a field related to conservation or natural resource enforcement. First aid and CPR level C certification are required and park wardens must meet medical and physical fitness standards.

Additional requirements also typically include a year of relevant experience in an area such as fish, wildlife, or recreation management, scientific work, or law enforcement.

Why work for Parks Canada? – Jobs at Parks Canada (pc.gc.ca)

Parks Canada has 46 national parks across the country such as Point Pelee National Park on the nearby shores of Lake Erie or Bruce Peninsula National Park in Tobermory and 171 national historic sites including Brantford’s very own Bell Homestead National Historic Site, the home where Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone on July 26, 1874 and Ruthven Park National Historic Site in Cayuga, as well as national historic canals and 4 national marine conservation areas.

A team of more than five thousand people work in a wide range of jobs at these sites. Anyone who wishes to apply for these opportunities can find them posted on www.jobs.gc.ca

People who work as Ecosystem Scientists, Archeologists and Resource Management Technicians, to name a few, protect the integrity of our special places, and visitors and residents in and around them. Their work safeguards both Canada’s special places and those who visit here.

Those who work as Public Education and Outreach Officers, Visitor Services Attendants and Interpreters open doors to places of discovery and learning, reflection and recreation. They also develop and deliver programs that recount the history of our land and our people – the stories of Canada that touch millions of visitors from around the world.

People in occupations such as Water & Wasterwater Operators, Social Scientists and Maintenance Workers provide support, advice, guidance and services in many fields.

The Ontario government manages provincial parks such as Long Point Provincial Park in Norfolk County and Selkirk Provincial Park in Haldimand County, which offer some similar jobs and careers as Parks Canada, while at the more local level there are conservation authorities.

The Grand River Conservation Authority (GRCA) manages water and other natural resources on behalf of 39 municipalities and close to one million residents of the Grand River watershed.

Brant Park Conservation Area which is nestled in a bend of the Grand River amid the historic communities of Brantford and Brant County is just a few minutes away from the First Nations territories of the Six Nations and Mississaugas of the New Credit and falls under the GRCA.

Explore jobs at the Grand River Conservation Authority:

Job opportunities – Grand River Conservation Authority

 

 

Tourism Grand Erie

Tourism Grand Erie

Before the Covid-19 Pandemic, Canada’s Tourism Industry accounted for $105 billion in total economic activity and 1.8 million jobs, half of which were held by people under the age of 35.

Tourism is a dynamic and vastly diverse industry, comprised of innovative travel, hospitality, accommodations, as well as various cultural and recreational businesses in every region of the country, including the Grand Erie region.

While the past year has placed a heavy toll on tourism, the support of local patrons has provided opportunities to kick-start recovery. In 2020, there were 13,666 jobs in the tourism industry in Grand Erie (13% decline from 2019) with Brantford employing the largest number of tourism positions (6,500) followed by Norfolk (3,602) and Haldimand Counties (1,795). (Source: EMSI Analyst)

Between December 2019 and December 2020, the local tourism sector lost 18 businesses. The total number of tourism businesses in Grand Erie as of December 2020 is 2851, of which 1297 have employees. Notably, 1,245 tourism businesses in the region employ 5-99 people and 14 employ 100-199. (Source: EMSI Analyst)

Some of the top tourism businesses in the region include personal care services and recreation businesses.

Completion of training for the tourism industry has been on the rise in our region in the recent past. In 2018, 222 people completed hospitality administration and management programs in Grand Erie, which is up from 108 in 2016. (Source: EMSI Analyst)

Over the course of the pandemic, tourism operators have worked to implement high standards of health and safety protocols and have often dedicated much time and resources on adapting premises, training staff and changing processes to ensure a safe and welcoming environment when they are given the go-ahead to reopen.

While there are currently still restrictions in place, there are great destinations, attractions and local businesses across Brantford, Six Nations, New Credit and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk to keep in mind for when measures are lifted. Below are some highlights of our region’s tourism destinations that you can plan now, to explore later.

Haldimand County

Visiting Haldimand County is a rural retreat with plentiful fishing opportunities and an abundance of cycling and hiking trails. In Haldimand County’s towns and hamlets, there is an atmosphere of small-town charm, with unique attractions, quaint shops, cultural and historic sites, and a range of accommodations and restaurants.

Six Nations of the Grand River

Located alongside the picturesque waters of the Grand River, Six Nations is a community everyone should experience. Visitors can explore its unique history, culture, events, attractions, businesses and a variety of experiences unmatched by any other community throughout the nation.

Norfolk County

Norfolk County’s wineries, breweries and farm markets highlight Norfolk County’s status as Ontario’s Garden. Some of its popular destinations are the towns along Lake Erie, with warm sandy beaches in Port Dover, Turkey Point and Long Point. Back roads provide scenic cycling routes and attractions include live theatre, boat cruises, tasty food in port towns. Abundant outdoor adventures include eco tourism, fishing, birding, star-gazing, and camping.

County of Brant

“Rich In Culture, Adventurous In Nature” – from paddling the Grand River to exploring parks and trails and visiting beautiful and vibrant small towns, the County of Brant has tons of charm to offer local residents and visitors once it is ready to reopen and welcome explorers.

Brantford

In Brantford, you can explore world-class entertainment options, shop at unique boutiques, taste your way through the city, and brush up on your local history at one of the city’s many museums and galleries.

While COVID-19 has had an undeniable impact on the tourism sector in our region, Grand Erie Jobs data indicates that many businesses within this sector are continuing to hire for top tourism positions, including retail salespersons, cashiers, store shelf stockers, retail sales supervisors and retail and wholesale trade managers.  

 

Canadian Census Provides Important Data

Canadian Census Provides Important Data

Most Canadians will have received their 2021 Census by now.

The census provides a count of Canada’s population – it was 35,151,728 when the last one was held in 2016 – but it does much more. Information collected in the census paints an up-to-date picture of Canadian society and how it has changed or is changing.

Canadians are being asked to complete the census online by May 11, Census Day. Census employees will follow up with people who don’t complete the census. They’ll likely explain why doing the census is important and provide a friendly reminder that Canadians are required to complete it by law every 5 years.

Statistics Canada is also conducting its Census of Agriculture during May. This census is aimed at farm operators across the county. In 2016, there were 193,650 farm operations in Canada – a number that will be updated with the 2021 census.

Short and long form census

Most Canadians, about 75%, will receive a short version of the census which will require only a few minutes to complete for an entire household. Questions will mainly cover: name, gender, date of birth, age, marital status and spoken languages of all members in a household.

A smaller number of Canadians will receive the long form version of the census. It contains the same questions, plus other questions about people’s birthplace, citizenship, cultural heritage, Indigenous status and religion. Other sections focus on education, mobility, housing, health issues and employment.

Questions that are related to the workforce include employment status, number of hours worked, occupation, self-employment, work location and commuting habits.

The Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie uses this census data to help with workforce planning in Brantford, Six Nations, New Credit, and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk.

Watch Statistics Canada’s video: How do I complete the questionnaire? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gc4zJBrpvm0

Why doing the census is important

Questions on who lives in a household helps the government understand family size and composition, including the number of children and seniors. This helps the government plan programs such as Old Age Security and the Canada Child Benefit.

In line, this information is used by provincial and local governments to help plan services for communities, including new schools, seniors’ residences and day cares.

Watch Statistics Canada’s video: Why the census is important https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOOy8_SpvHk

Census demographic data can also help small businesses understand their target market in their particular area.

Here’s more info from Statistics Canada on how businesses can use census data: https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/smallbusiness-petitesentreprises/index-eng.htm

Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie – Our Census Map Tool

Our Grand Erie Jobs website has a free online Census Map Tool anyone can use to look up census information from the 2016 census. https://workforceplanningboard.org/census-tool/

There’s information on population, families, language, aboriginal peoples, citizenship, immigration, housing, education and more. Workforce related data includes size of the workforce, number of Canadians who work in each occupation and each industry, where people work, language of work, place of work and commuting habits.

For example, the 2016 census told us that 1,920 Haldimand County residents worked in their homes, while 65 residents worked outside Canada. There are also numbers for how many residents travel outside Haldimand to work and how many come to the county to work. There’s similar data for all Grand Erie communities.

If the information appears dated on the Census Map Tool, since it is from 2016, that just reinforces the importance of completing the 2021 census, so we have more up-to-date data.

Youth Work NOW! Employment Webinar

Youth Work NOW! Employment Webinar

Youth Work NOW! – an online webinar taking place Thursday, April 29th at 11Am will help our local youth search for a summer job or their first job. The session will feature short presentations by about a dozen employment related services from our region.

The COVID-19 Pandemic has added unique challenges for youth and their ability to find employment. Public health restrictions, layoffs for the least experienced employees, closures and the struggle of some industries are some factors that have been identified as preventing youth from gaining employment.

A recent regional study revealed about half of youth surveyed stated they need help looking for jobs and over half of youth expressed they lack information about employment programming and job searching tools

To assist our region’s youth the Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie has organized Youth Work NOW! to inform local youth ages 15-24 about current resources, programs and services offered across our region to help them find a summer job; for graduating students or for youth not in school – their first full time job and to also help those interested in learning how they can start their own business.

Educational institutions and area organization such as St. Leonard’s Community Services, Brantford-Brant Business Resource Centre, CareerLink and about half a dozen other regional employment service providers will be participating in the webinar to talk about ways they help youth gain employment and resources will be compiled in a catalogue made available publicly on our website.

Youth and their families are invited to join the webinar which will include a Q&A portion and gain access to valuable programs and supports that can assist youth in finding temporary or full-time employment.

For those not available to attend the event on April 29, the webinar is recorded and available for viewing here: https://youtu.be/vx0ePHZLi4g

Partners and Resources:

Grand Erie District School Board: Home :: Grand Erie District School Board

CareerLink: About :: Career Link

St. Leonard’s Community Services Wrap Program: Youth Employment Skills Strategy – Work Readiness and Advancement Program (WRAP) | St. Leonard’s (st-leonards.com)

Brant Skills Centre: Brant Skills Centre

G.R.E.A.T: The Student Office – GREAT (greatsn.com)

Fanshawe Community Career and Employment Services: Community Career and Employment Services (Simcoe) | Fanshawe College

City School by Mohawk: City School by Mohawk | Mohawk College

Brantford Business Resource Centre: Business Resource Centre – City of Brantford – Economic Development (advantagebrantford.ca)

First Work: First Work – Ontario’s Youth Employment Network

First Work Aspire Initiative: Home – Youth Aspire

Wilfrid Laurier University LaunchPad: LaunchPad | Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation | Students – Wilfrid Laurier University (wlu.ca)

Wilfrid Laurier University: Career and Employment Support | Students – Wilfrid Laurier University (wlu.ca)

Conestoga College: https://studentsuccess.conestogac.on.ca/myCareer

Six Nations Polytechnic: Careers | Six Nations Polytechnic (snpolytechnic.com)CareerLink: Job Seeker :: Career Link

Contact North: Welcome to contactnorth.ca | Contact North | contactnorth.ca

Canadian Mental Health Association Brant Haldimand NorfolkCMHA Brant Haldimand Norfolk – Mental Health for All  

Grand Erie Jobs: https://workforceplanningboard.org/find-jobs/

Celebrating Grand Erie’s Essential Workers – John

Celebrating Grand Erie’s Essential Workers – John

Today, in our Frontline Fridays feature we talk to Paramedic John Ellis who works for Haldimand County Paramedic Services.

Through Frontline Fridays the Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie pays tribute to essential workers in our community. Essential workers have helped us cope with the COVID-19 pandemic in Brantford, Six Nations, New Credit, and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk.

Paramedics like John respond to emergency calls every day and provide emergency medical care to those in need onsite or in route to hospitals or other medical facilities. Paramedics regularly help save human lives.

What does an average day look like for you?

John: Haldimand County Paramedic Services covers an approximately 1300 sq km area. This coverage is provided by five ambulances during the day, and three on nights. Our day begins by checking the ambulance to which we are assigned, to make sure the ambulance is fully stocked, the equipment checked and tested and to make sure it functions as it should. This is regularly performed twice daily to prepare for what could be a busy day. 

Once we complete our daily checks, we log on to our Central Ambulance Communications Centre.  This Centre controls the movement of our ambulances and receives any 911 calls that drop in our area.  When a call is received, a Pager alarm goes off at the station closest to the 911 call, or, if the ambulance is out of the station, the call comes over the radio.

We receive calls for all types of emergencies. These could be medical, such as a person having a heart attack, drug overdoses, traffic accidents, fires, shootings – the list is infinite.  We respond to the call and provide medical assistance to anyone in need.  We have a list of medical procedures and protocols that we follow and that we are trained for. The protocols are medical guidelines that we must follow and they provide the template of care that paramedics follow. A normal day can consist of 6 or more calls.  After each call, an Electronic Patient Care Reporting document (EPCR) is completed for each patient that we treat.  This documentation is a requirement of the Ministry of Health and must be completed by the end of shift.

How has COVID-19 affected your day-to-day work?

John: COVID-19 has added a whole new level of protection and sanitizing level to the profession.  While we are riding in the ambulance, whether it is to a call or out in our area roaming, a face mask must be worn by each Paramedic in the front of the cab of the ambulance as we are less than 2 metres apart and thus cannot socially distance. 

When we respond to a call that could be a potential or confirmed COVID 19 patient, we must put on all our protective equipment on arrival at the scene. This includes a gown, gloves, a respirator, safety glasses, a face shield, boot covers, and a hair cover. This is to protect the patient as well as us. Upon completion of the call, all this safety equipment must be removed in a specific way as to not contaminate yourself or others. If the item is disposable, it is placed in a biohazard container, if it is reusable then it must be cleaned with special cleaning agents that will destroy the COVID-19 virus. If the patient was confirmed to have COVID-19, the medic must shower and change into a new clean uniform. The ambulance must then be decontaminated by a special machine that fogs the interior of the patient compartment to destroy any virus particles that may have been transferred. All this protection has made us hypervigilant about staying safe as we do not want to bring the virus to the next patient picked up by the ambulance, and we also do not want to bring it home to our families.

What has it been like to be an essential worker during the pandemic?

John: Being an essential worker during this time has been stressful and sometimes difficult. Much of our day is spent with patients that require assistance, often involving close contact which cannot be helped or avoided. We as paramedics must be vigilant on every call, as frequently it is not known what the patient is suffering from. A good and safe rule of thumb is to assume worst case scenario – meaning assume every patient has COVID-19 and protect yourself as mentioned earlier. Then we protect ourselves as well as the patient from spreading the virus to someone else. 

On leaving work to come home, a whole new regime is performed before I can greet my family.  I remove my uniform and shower before leaving work and change into clean clothes to not spread anything inside my vehicle. That way when I arrive home, I can greet my family knowing that I have not brought anything home and my family is safe.

What has been the greatest rewards and challenges in your work?

John: Becoming a paramedic was something I always wanted to do. I have been a paramedic for almost 18 years, and I enjoy coming to work now as if it was my first day!  I work with the greatest bunch of people anyone could ask for. We are a small service, and we are like family.  We all get along, work together to achieve goals, and help each other out when and where we can.

The greatest reward, however, is the one I get from helping a patient feel better, in trying to make one of their worst days a little less stressful. To be there with supportive words, and a hand to hold if that’s what will help. There are challenges with some patients that can be difficult, but in the end I treat everyone the same, “the way I would like to be treated “. Whether it is rewards or challenges, being a paramedic is the best feeling and the best job in the world to me.

What have been your greatest supports and means of coping as an essential worker this past year?

John: My greatest supports and means of coping have been my family and my co-workers. My co-workers and I have common ground and due to our family-like atmosphere we have been able to get through this past year together. My family at home helps me keep grounded and are my rock that I can grab onto when I need it. I also have hobbies and things around the house that need to get done that provide a pleasant and non-stressful diversion.

What made you pursue your career? What lead you to take a job in this community?

John: Previously, I was working full-time in another field. Throughout my life I have always wanted to become a paramedic. The opportunity arose and I took the leap of faith at the age of 38. I was accepted into the program at Niagara College. It was the best move and life change I have ever made. I already had a BSc in Biology and had a relevant background.

I chose Haldimand County as it was a smaller service and I had heard from other people it was a great service to work for, plus I had visited Haldimand many times and loved the small town feel and the great sense of community here. I would not trade my time in Haldimand County for anything. From my point of view, it is the best service around to work for!!

What was your education/training?

John: I graduated from Brock University with a BSc in Biology. I had gained life experience working full-time in a couple of other fields, before returning to school at Niagara College for the two-year Paramedic Program. Upon graduating, I was immediately hired by Haldimand County, and I also worked part-time for Niagara EMS for a couple of years. 

My true home was Haldimand. The medics and management made me feel right at home. If you had any questions, management was always willing to help and to try to answer my questions. Our management staff has been fantastic in bringing new skills and specialized training to us and our service. They are always willing to provide us with training to keep up on the leading edge of a rapidly growing profession.

What advice would you give to someone interested in pursuing your career?

John: I would strongly recommend pursuing a post-secondary education, especially in the sciences, and/or health sciences. This will give them the background in human biological systems and make going through the Paramedic Program a little easier, as there is a lot of learning when it comes to becoming a Paramedic. A lot of time is spent learning how to assess and identify what is going on with a patient, along with how to treat that patient. The profession involves continual testing and education to hone your skills and keep current.

A person going into this career must have a truly genuine interest in helping people and be an understanding and compassionate individual. These qualities will go a long way in helping your patient trust you and making them feel safe.

Above all, you must love the satisfaction of knowing that you were able to help someone in their time of need.

 

Are you thinking of becoming a Paramedic? See Paramedic Careers for more information.

 

Local Training and Certification for careers like John’s:

Ontario Paramedic Association:

OPA – Becoming a Paramedic (ontarioparamedic.ca)

Conestoga College:

Paramedic | Full-time | Ontario College Diploma (conestogac.on.ca)

Fanshawe College:

Paramedic | Fanshawe College

Advanced Care Paramedic | Fanshawe College

Paramedic Association of Canada:

Paramedic Association of Canada Home Page

Statistics Canada Occupational Classification:

NOC 2011 – 3234 – Paramedical occupations – Unit group (statcan.gc.ca)

Search Local Paramedic Jobs: Grand Erie Jobs  

Celebrating Grand Erie’s Essential Workers – Jim

Celebrating Grand Erie’s Essential Workers – Jim

Through Frontline Fridays the Workforce Planning Board of Grand Erie pays tribute to essential workers in our community. Essential workers have helped us cope with the COVID-19 pandemic in Brantford, Six Nations, New Credit, and the counties of Brant, Haldimand and Norfolk.

Today, in our Frontline Fridays feature we talk to volunteer firefighter Jim Kent. Jim has volunteered with the Haldimand County Fire Department Station 4 (Cayuga) for approximately 35 years.

Deputy Fire Chief Rodger Hill commends Jim for his outstanding contributions to the department over the years and during the recent pandemic crisis:

“Jim Kent has not only served our community, but our firefighters week after week. It is rare to come across someone who is so dedicated and trustworthy, and we want Jim to be recognized for that.

Jim is the co-chair of the Fire Joint Health and Safety Committee and sits on the County’s Health and Safety Co-Chairs committee. He is regularly involved in health and safety meetings, discussions, policy reviews, management of fire hall safety. More noticeably he takes the time to ensure these items, as well as Health & Safety Boards, are consistent in each hall.

Additionally, Jim maintains records, schedules and conducts fit testing for all firefighters on both Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus and N95 masks. Jim travels to each fire hall regularly throughout the year, to conduct fit testing – that is approximately 548 fit tests per year taking numerous hours!

Jim consistently goes above and beyond. Recently due to COVID, he has undertaken going to all the stations to disinfect/sanitize fire apparatus. He has also taken a great interest in assisting at the vaccine clinics taking place throughout the county.

Jim’s efforts have not gone unnoticed, and we would like to extend our thanks and gratitude for everything that he does.”  

What made you pursue this role?

Jim: Back in 1985, I was asked by the Fisherville deputy fire chief if I was interested in joining the local volunteer fire department. I was a bit apprehensive about it, but I said yes. At that time, you had to submit two letters of recommendation from two firefighters and then it went to a vote from the station firefighters. In January of 1986 I became a member of the department. I was then involved in the village community.

What was your education/training?

Jim: I have a Grade 12 education and no training in firefighting.  Once I joined the department, I was expected to attend station training every Monday evening.  It was also recommended that you would go to the Haldimand- Norfolk fire school weekend training sessions held once a year. The Haldimand County Fire Department now holds weekend training in specific subjects such as ice and water rescue, pump ops, live fire, etc. in addition to Monday night training.

What does the average day look like for you?

Jim: Although most days we do not have calls, we carry pagers which alert us to fire calls on a 24/7 basis which include fires, burning complaints, medical calls and similar. I am also the “worker co-chair” on the Health and Safety Committee which involves attending meetings

In my other tasks, I do fit testing of nearly 300 firefighters to make sure that they are wearing the proper Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) mask at fire scenes and the proper medical mask on medical calls. This testing is done during evenings on a 2-year cycle and includes updating fit test data on each firefighter.

Additionally, Haldimand County Fire Department has a fleet of 42 vehicles located in 12 different locations and I sanitize the trucks using a Noco-Sprayer on a 3-month basis. This process takes one hour per vehicle and about two full days a month.

How has Covid-19 affected your day-to-day work?

Jim: On medical calls, if patient is VSA (Vital Signs Absent), unconscious or Covid-19 positive, we now must wear gowns over our bunker gear/PPE, medical mask and gloves, face shield or goggles. If a patient is Covid-19 positive, personal protective equipment and gear must be washed on return to the firehall.

All trucks and equipment must now be wiped down with disinfectant after fire calls and training sessions. While riding in vehicles, in training sessions and on calls, every firefighter is required to be wearing a medical mask. As well, all tables and chairs in training rooms are now sanitized after each use.

Along with three or four other firefighters, I now also spend two days a week working at the vaccination clinic.  Our job includes directing traffic in the parking lot, directing people in the arena and helping seniors fill out the application form for vaccination.

What has it been like to be an essential worker during the pandemic?

Jim: During fit testing, I try to maintain as much social distancing as possible.  Due to disinfecting protocols, where it used to take 20 minutes to test a firefighter, it now takes 30 minutes minimum.

What advice would you give to someone interested in becoming a volunteer firefighter?

Jim: I would say have a great interest and passion for being a volunteer in your local community and be dedicated in wanting to provide your time to training and attending calls. Someone can gain skills for becoming a volunteer firefighter from doing other volunteer service in the community, work experience or training, as well as athletic involvement. Challenging yourself to learn is important.

For information on how to become a volunteer firefighter with Haldimand County: Become a Volunteer Firefighter – Haldimand County

Local Training and Certification for firefighters and roles like Jim’s:

Ontario Fire Academy:

Get Professional Firefighter Training at Ontario Fire Academy

Ontario Fire Administration:

Firefighter Technical Skills Assessment | Ontario Fire Administration Inc. (ofai.ca)

Conestoga College:

Pre-Service Firefighter Education and Training | Full-time | Ontario College Certificate (conestogac.on.ca)

Ontario Colleges:

Firefighting / Fire Systems | ontariocolleges.ca

Firefighters Association of Ontario:

Fire Fighters Association Ontario | We Are Working For You (ffao.on.ca)

Ontario Professional Firefighters Association of Ontario:

OPFFA – Home

Fanshawe College:

Fire Safety Systems | Fanshawe College

Mohawk College:

Mohawk College Emergency Operations Centre Management and Emergency Site Management Course | Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs (oafc.on.ca)

Statistics Canada Occupational Profile:

NOC 2011 – 4312 – Firefighters – Unit group (statcan.gc.ca)

Search Local Fire Services Jobs:

Grand Erie Jobs  

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